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Fig With Yellow Leaves – Reasons For Yellow Leaves On Fig Trees

Fig With Yellow Leaves – Reasons For Yellow Leaves On Fig Trees


Why are my fig leaves turning yellow? If you own a fig tree, yellow leaves will be a concern at some point in its life. Questions about yellow fig leaves show up every year on every gardening site and the answers often seem to contradict each other. But, if you look at the short list of the causes of yellow leaves on fig trees, they all have one thing in common: stress.

Fig trees and their sweet fruit are gaining popularity with home gardeners across the globe. Once confined to the regions around the Mediterranean Sea, figs are now found everywhere in the world where the winters are mild. The trees are relatively pest free and easy to propagate, so why does that one simple question keep popping up? Why are my fig leaves turning yellow?

Reasons for a Fig With Yellow Leaves

Just like people, plants can suffer from stress, and stress is the cause of those yellow leaves on fig trees. The trick is to discover the cause of the stress. There are four areas of stress that will give you a fig tree with yellow leaves.

Water

Water, or its lack, is probably the largest cause of stress for your fig tree. Yellow leaves can be the result of either too much or too little water. We gardeners need to remember where our fig trees originated.

The land around the Mediterranean is warm and dry. Fig tree roots grow close to the surface to absorb every drop of rain that falls. The water that isn’t absorbed quickly drains through the porous soil. To avoid yellow fig leaves, make sure your trees get water about once a week through rain or your garden hose. Plant your figs in soil that drains well, and don’t incorporate moisture retaining additives to the soil when you transplant. Instead, mulch well around the base of your tree to retain more water on the surface.

Transplant shock

Has your fig with yellow leaves been transplanted lately? Transplanting from a pot or to a new place in the yard can be stressful and cause the loss of up to 20 percent of the foliage on your fig tree. Yellow leaves can also be the result of fluctuations in temperatures. Temperature changes from the nursery to your yard can be enough to cause leaf drop and if the nighttime temperatures drop below 50 degrees F. (10 C.) outside of the dormant season, the results will be yellow fig leaves.

The shock of transplanting normally rights itself, but you can also take steps to prevent transplant shock by ensuring proper planting requirements are met.

Fertilizer

Nitrogen is essential to healthy cell growth and division in plants. Without it, chloroplasts (the tiny cell structures that make your plant green) can’t provide enough nutrients and energy to your fig. Leaves turning yellow or yellow-green when environmental factors are normal may indicate a deficiency in nitrogen.

Yearly fertilization of figs should quickly cure the problem, but don’t expect your fig tree’s yellow leaves to turn green again. Those leaves must fall and be replaced by new, healthy green ones.

Pests

Lastly, insect infestation can cause yellow leaves on fig trees. Though rare on healthy trees, scale, spider mites and mealybugs can all cause enough damage to foliage to cause yellowing and leaf drop. Insecticides or insecticidal soap will easily cure the problem.

While yellow leaves on fig trees may be disturbing to the gardener, the condition isn’t fatal and with careful attention to the stressors your tree may be suffering, the condition should be easily cured.


Houseplants forum→fiddle leaf fig leaves yellowing and dropping??

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some leaves have been lost from the middle and the bottom mostly.

am i underwatering it? i usually wait until the top two inches are quite dry. i also haven't been fertilizing it as much. could that be the problem? or is it just the time of year?




What kind of light does it get?
Have you moved it lately?

I've let my FLF dry pretty thoroughly (maybe 2 inches as well) between watering before, and while it wasn't optimal, it did not drop leaves.

CrazedHoosier said: It is my understanding that leaf loss in FLFs occur when conditions drastically change, there isn't enough light, or there is a watering problem.

What kind of light does it get?
Have you moved it lately?

I've let my FLF dry pretty thoroughly (maybe 2 inches as well) between watering before, and while it wasn't optimal, it did not drop leaves.

i repotted it about 3 weeks ago. i moved it from its nursery pot into a bigger terra-cotta and added cactus soil for better drainage.

it sits about a foot from a southwest facing window. there's a lot of bright indirect light and then a little direct light in the afternoon.


I'm not sure cactus & succulent mix is what an FLF prefers, as they actually like to hold onto some moisture. If you pair cactus & succulent mix with a southwest facing window, you're going to get a soil that dries very quickly. Let's see what @WillC says.

CrazedHoosier said: I think the leaf loss may be due to the stress of being repotted. Most figs, FLFs included, do not like any drastic changes.

I'm not sure cactus & succulent mix is what an FLF prefers, as they actually like to hold onto some moisture. If you pair cactus & succulent mix with a southwest facing window, you're going to get a soil that dries very quickly. Let's see what @WillC says.

Ah I see! Would you recommend I water it more often then? Or move it back to its original pot? I left its root ball in tact just added new soil in the bottom and sides of the pot.

The loss of leaves prior to the repotting was caused by the soil getting too dry. I know that allowing the top 2 inches of soil is a common recommendation. However, that generally deprives the roots of the moisture they require.

As Crazed Hosier mentioned, the combination of the Cactus soil and the terra cotta pot will cause the soil to dry out more rapidly than usual. With yours, I suggest that you water it a soon as the surface of the soil feels almost dry and always water thoroughly until some water drains through the drain hole. Overwatering is very unlikely to ever be a problem.

Fertilize only at half strength and only when the plant is putting out new growth.

Give your plant time to recover from the stress of the repotting. New leaves will come in at the top ends of the stems, but will not replace lower leaves that are already lost.

Hey you guys! I've been trying to follow this advice but I'm pretty bad at telling when the top of the soil is actually dry versus cold/slightly damp/etc.

So I got a moisture meter (I know a lot of people don't like them but I think it might help since I'm generally clueless about these things). I put the meter in halfway down the pot and wait for it to get to a 3 before I water again.

It looks like another one of my leaves might drop soon.

Am I still underwatering? Would you recommend watering based on a schedule instead of feeling the soil? For someone who needs a moisture meter what number should I water it at? Is it still losing leaves because of stress? Should I stop worrying so much?

Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)


I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!

Playing in the dirt is my therapy . and I'm in therapy a lot!

Sometimes I water with a watering can (to get a better idea of how much water i'm using) and sometimes i take it in the shower and water until it drains (to soak it more thoroughly). which method is better?

Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)


I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!

Playing in the dirt is my therapy . and I'm in therapy a lot!


You should try fertilizing your plant.

A lack of proper nutrients in your plants soil can cause yelling of the leaves. Your plant needs the proper amount of necessary nutrients in the soil to have healthy leaves. Many soils do not have the proper nutrients for the fiddle leaf fig and your plant may be starving.

In order to combat the lack of nutrients, you can add fertilizer to the soil. The type of fertilizer that you need for your fiddle must have the right NPK ratio. The proper NPK ratio for the fiddle leaf fig is 9:3:6. The NPK ratio is the ratio of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium in the fertilizer.

Luckily there is a fertilizer that you can buy that is perfect for your fiddle. Foliage Pro by Dyna-Gro has the perfect NPK ratio for the FLF. I use the fertilizer on all my FLFs and they are all loving it and growing healthily.


Q. Scale on my Ficus Creeping Vine

This vine is growing on the front wall of my home. I keep it well manicured and is usually a source of admiration by passersby. It creates great street appeal. However, over the past year or so, it has become heavily infested with scale and sooty mold as well as millions of black ants. Because I was led to understand that the ficus was indestructible and also because I had no prior knowledge of the problem, I did nothing. Now there are patches of dead wood showing and I'm wondering if it is beyond help. A large part of the plant is still green and still growing. I really need some advice and help as I do not want to lose the plant.

You will need to address each of the issues with different approaches.
I have listed links to help with each of the problems.

I would prune away any dead material and dispose of.

Clean up any fallen leaf material. Do not compost this material.


How to Check your Fiddle Leaf Fig Soil Acidity Levels

You should check the pH of your soil at least twice a year.

Use our fiddle leaf fig soil meter to test the moisture, ph and light of your fiddle leaf fig.

If you find the pH of your soil is too high, repot your plant and water normally with a well-balanced fertilizer for a fiddle leaf fig.

If repotting your plant is not possible, you can use Alkaline Water Drops to make a batch of alkaline water and thoroughly water your plant.

To learn more about coffee grounds and your fiddle leaf fig, watch the video below:


Watch the video: why plant leaves turn brown and dry on the ends