Information

Laurel-Sauce -

Laurel-Sauce -


Grow laurel-sauce

The bay laurel is an interesting shrub in the garden because its growth is strong as soon as it is in place. The bay leaves are very interesting in cooking, used on meat they give off pleasant flavors for tasty cooking. They can be mixed with other aromatic plants, in a bouquet garni. In the garden, it is a plant that reseeds easily in the rich, drained soil that the shrub particularly likes. First at the foot of the shrub and then by gaining height, its seeds take the wind or are moved by the birds and will settle much further in the garden - even in that of the neighbors a little further. The leaves give off a powerful aroma when crumpled. We know less, in infusion, they relieve stomach aches. In a completely different field, they are used without the manufacture of Aleppo soap.

Botanical name:

Laurus Nobilis

Plant info:

• Cycle: Perennial
• Foliage: Persistent
• Hardiness: Hardy plant - 22 ° C
• Family: Lauraceae - Lauraceae
• Gender: Laurus
• Harbor : shrubby
• Exhibition: Sun and partial shade
• Ground : Any rich and drained soil
• Sowing: Spring and out of frost.
• Cutting: end of summer
• Plantation: Autumn and Spring outside the frost period
• Flowering: April June
• Fruiting: spring (berries)
• Rooting: Roots
• Cultivation area: Rustic plant up to zone 6 France hardiness map Quebec hardiness map
• Origin: Asia Minor and Mediterranean rim.
• Honey plant: Yes
• Edible plant: Yes
• Poisonous Plant: Be careful with do not mix up with the cherry laurel and oleander which are toxic.

Special features of Laurier-sauce

• The shrub is easily reseeds.
• Leaves glazed.
• The leaves are very rich in essential oil.
• Indispensable in the kitchen.
• Be careful with the choice of variety, some are not very hardy.
• Leaves are easy to dry for cooking. As it dries the leaves thin out.

Advantage in the garden

• Easy to grow
• Rapid growth
• No maintenance when grown in the ground.

Description

The Bay Laurel after a few years may have grown into a small tree 6 to 8 meters in height and 2 meters in wingspan, when it becomes comfortable. Its foliage is dense, the wood quite hard. The leaves are lanceolate and glazed and fairly dark green.

What soil for its culture?

• A rather rich and drained.

Method of multiplication:

• Sowing: The bay leaf multiplies quite easily.
• Discharges: When the shrub is well established, it produces many suckers at its base.
• Cutting: Easy in summer.
• Layering : Easy spring and summer.

When to sow bay laurel?

• Sowing in the ground: In spring preferably, after periods of frost
• Sowing under shelter: All year

How to sow the bay leaf?

The bay leaf is easy to sow in the ground, in fairly rich and drained soil. It reseeds very easily if you let the shrub produce its seeds. But the realization of the seedlings outside the natural field, requires the stratification, it can be long as well, while the cuttings allow you to obtain a shrub of interesting size more quickly.

Laminate the seeds:

• Be careful, the berry is not the seed, the seeds are inside the berries.
• Dry the seeds.
• Place them in the refrigerator for 90 days. the equivalent of a winter.

Sowing in the ground:

• Work the soil where you want to produce the seedlings.
• Add a little soil for seedlings and sand to improve the draining power.
• Place the seeds in pockets of 2-3 seeds 1cm deep.
• Cover them with potting soil and tamp lightly.
• Water.
• Keep moist until germination.

Sowing under shelter:

• Prepare medium pots filled with a mixture of potting soil, peat and garden soil 33/33/33%.
• Place the seeds on the surface.
• Cover with a light layer of seed soil.
• Water and keep the soil moist.

It takes about 3 years for the seedlings to give a small shrub, the growth accelerates sharply in the years that follow.

When and where to plant it:

• Plant the shrub all year round outside of frost periods.
• In view of its growth capacity, you have to be careful with the shade it might produce in the vegetable patch or even in the garden. Place in a very strategic place where its size will not interfere with other crops.
• Good to know, the shrub accepts semi-shaded or sunny exposure.

How to plant laurel sauce?

Before planting the shrub it is necessary to ask the question of its location because the shrub can reach a fairly large size and produce a large area of ​​shade but above all greatly encroaches on the surface of a vegetable garden. But you can use it as a hedge to keep "at size".

• Work the soil at the height of a spade without turning it over.
• Amend the soil in the potting soil garden.
• Add sand to improve the draining power.
• Make a hole a little wider and deeper than the size of the root ball.
• Scrape the roots around the edge of the root ball.
• Place the root ball.
• Fill with the mixture of garden soil and potting soil.
• Tamp with your foot.
• Water generously.
• Watch for the shrub to recover, the first year it may be necessary to provide watering in case of drought.

When to cut?

Prefer a semi-hardened branch cuttings at the end of summer:
• End of August and September
A root cuttings (rejection) can be done without frost.

How to cut?

The cuttings in the case of bay leaf is easy to achieve:

• Take stems of about 15 cm.
• Remove the leaves from the bottom of the stem, leaving only 4 or 4 at the end.
• If you are "equipped" soak the base in cutting hormone to promote root development.
• Plant the cuttings in pots filled with planting soil.
• Water.
• Store the cuttings in winter in a cool, bright room, but where it does not freeze.
• Transplant the following spring.

What exhibition?

• Exhibition sun and half shade.

The harvest?

• All year

Preservation method:

• As the tree grows rapidly after a few years, it is necessary to prune it every year.
• Once the branches are cut, the smaller ones can remain whole.
• For larger ones, the sheets can be collected one by one and set aside.
• Let them dry for a few days in a dry place, then ...
• Place them in a box protected from light and humidity.

Interview :

Prune the shrub every year from the 3rd or 4th year.
Don't let it go to seed to prevent it from spreading them everywhere.

Quick sheet:

Photo by H. Zell picked on wikimedia.org under creative commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)


The poisonous bay leaf?

Hello tribe,
Sunday, during a picnic, a friend told us that the bay leaf sauce was poisonous FRESH, that it had to be eaten dried for it to be safe.

I stayed on the c .. not in shock! since I eat it, and all of mine with it!

It even seems that a little girl died recently! I made sure it was really bay leaf sauce and not tin, cherry or worse pink, it was bay leaf sauce.

Who can inform me, and the others at the same time: there's something to worry about!

Your browser can not display this video tag.

Hello tribe,
Sunday, during a picnic, a friend told us that the bay leaf sauce was poisonous FRESH, that it had to be eaten dried for it to be safe.

I stayed on the c .. not in shock! since I eat it, and all of mine with it!

It even seems that a little girl died recently! I made sure it was really bay leaf sauce and not tin, cherry or worse pink, it was bay leaf sauce.

Who can inform me, and the others at the same time: there's something to worry about!

I had been told this too, that I should not consume fresh bay leaves, but it seems that this is not true.

Hello tribe,
Sunday, during a picnic, a friend told us that the bay leaf sauce was poisonous FRESH, that it had to be eaten dried for it to be safe.

I stayed on the c .. not in shock! since I eat it, and all of mine with it!

It even seems that a little girl died recently! I made sure it was really bay leaf sauce and not tin, cherry or worse pink, it was bay leaf sauce.

Who can inform me, and the others at the same time: there's something to worry about!

And again this, where we can see that there is no toxicity
http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/laurier_sauce.php

do a search in the forum, we already talked about it, I don't know when.

I had been told this too, that I should not consume fresh bay leaves, but it seems that this is not true.

apparently the confusion comes from the fact that the bay laurel is very similar to the oleander which is extremely toxic, even fatal to children and animals.

And again this, where we can see that there is no toxicity
http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/laurier_sauce.php

Well then! 73 years that I see my grandmother, my mother and myself going to pick fresh leaves on the shrub itself in person which I own like everyone else in my garden in my midday.
The fresh leaves are more fragrant moreover and are the ones that I use in priority. This shrub, well known by our region, has evergreen leaves, so all year round and at the moment making new, beautiful leaves like every spring. I was of course talking about the bay leaf, we agree!

And again this, where we can see that there is no toxicity
http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/laurier_sauce.php

it is the oleander which is poisonous. and not the bay leaf sauce, since time it has been known.

And again this, where we can see that there is no toxicity
http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/laurier_sauce.php

not toxic not true, I use it fresh and frozen fresh, never dry which has no more taste

And again this, where we can see that there is no toxicity
http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/laurier_sauce.php

Well say, we are really tough in the south, since the time that we flavor our dishes with fresh bay leaves sauce. and we're still alive)

And again this, where we can see that there is no toxicity
http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/laurier_sauce.php

It's not only in the south that we are apparently tough, in the northeast also the laurels have leaves all year round and therefore fresh bay leaves for good meals

Hello tribe,
Sunday, during a picnic, a friend told us that the bay leaf sauce was poisonous FRESH, that it had to be eaten dried for it to be safe.

I stayed on the c .. not in shock! since I eat it, and all of mine with it!

It even seems that a little girl died recently! I made sure it was really bay leaf sauce and not tin, cherry or worse pink, it was bay leaf sauce.

Who can inform me, and the others at the same time: there's something to worry about!

I heard the same thing, and I freaked out like you. I asked the question on this site and got only reassuring answers. So I continue to use FRESH. biz

Hello tribe,
Sunday, during a picnic, a friend told us that the bay leaf sauce was poisonous FRESH, that it had to be eaten dried for it to be safe.

I stayed on the c .. not in shock! since I eat it, and all of mine with it!

It even seems that a little girl died recently! I made sure it was really bay leaf sauce and not tin, cherry or worse pink, it was bay leaf sauce.

Who can inform me, and the others at the same time: there's something to worry about!

bay leaf sauce is poisonous in high doses like a bunch of spices and herbs

our ancestors the Greeks got high with it, especially the Maenads during the ceremonies of the cult of Dionysus (hu hu, look a little)

and by giving a laurel wreath to the victors of wars and the Olympic games or to successful poets, I wonder if we were not offering them a dose of drunkenness and artificial paradise rather than a decoration for their crazy hair


Laurel sauce

Not being able to sleep, I watch Carine and you with Clelia Ventura on Cuisine TV. And in the recipe, you have to put bay leaf. Clélia specifies that she puts bay leaf to dry because the fresh is toxic, which Carine immediately confirms.

Having a bay laurel in the garden and always using the fresh bay laurel, I was more than astonished as no one has ever been sick to my knowledge. So I searched the net a bit and got confirmation of what I thought, it's c. laughs. I took the opportunity to come across an old discussion on the Marmite http://www.marmiton.org/forum/theme-patisserie/d-feuilles-de-laurier-sauce-121592.aspx

Considering when the discussion dates, I find it interesting to remember that we can frankly go there and eat bay leaf with fresh sauce.

Having said that, the proposed recipe which was a macaronade prepared by Lino Ventura seemed very good. Too bad the CuisineTV site does not provide it.

Your browser can not display this video tag.

Not being able to sleep, I watch Carine and you with Clelia Ventura on Cuisine TV. And in the recipe, you have to put bay leaf. Clélia specifies that she puts bay leaf to dry because the fresh is toxic, which Carine immediately confirms.

Having a bay laurel in the garden and always using the fresh bay laurel, I was more than astonished as no one has ever been sick to my knowledge. So I searched the net a bit and got confirmation of what I thought, it's c. laughs. I took the opportunity to come across an old discussion on the Marmite http://www.marmiton.org/forum/theme-patisserie/d-feuilles-de-laurier-sauce-121592.aspx

Considering when the discussion dates, I find it interesting to remember that we can frankly go there and eat bay leaf with fresh sauce.

Having said that, the proposed recipe which was a macaronade prepared by Lino Ventura seemed very good. Too bad the CuisineTV site does not provide it.

I have always used, and my mother and my grandmother - and my mother-in-law. before me the fresh leaves and stems. worry-free.

even I always have a stick (rather big branch) with my wooden spoons, to "turn" in certain sauces.

good night, when the sandman has passed
giza

I have always used, and my mother and my grandmother - and my mother-in-law. before me the fresh leaves and stems. worry-free.

even I always have a stick (rather big branch) with my wooden spoons, to "turn" in certain sauces.

good night, when the sandman has passed
giza

Here too, we have a bay leaf sauce and as soon as I need bay leaf, I prick it into the tree! never been intoxicated. but Mummies are tough!

In the same vein, I wondered if what we hear about the toxicity of the branches and leaves of tomatoes had been proven, except of course the s. peries of treatments that some brush on the plants.

Not being able to sleep, I watch Carine and you with Clelia Ventura on Cuisine TV. And in the recipe, you have to put bay leaf. Clélia specifies that she puts bay leaf to dry because the fresh is toxic, which Carine immediately confirms.

Having a bay laurel in the garden and always using the fresh bay laurel, I was more than astonished as no one has ever been sick to my knowledge. So I searched the net a bit and got confirmation of what I thought, it's c. laughs. I took the opportunity to come across an old discussion on the Marmite http://www.marmiton.org/forum/theme-patisserie/d-feuilles-de-laurier-sauce-121592.aspx

Considering when the discussion dates, I find it interesting to remember that we can frankly go there and eat bay leaf with fresh sauce.

Having said that, the proposed recipe which was a macaronade prepared by Lino Ventura seemed very good. Too bad the CuisineTV site does not provide it.

as for the laurel-sauce, seeing little dry interest in it, I use it fresh.

I wouldn't chew it either, just tasted, gotta hang on
it would be necessary to chew the leaves of whole branches to have a toxic side and to obtain hallucinations. lol

(there is surely something else faster)

and who wants to play the Pythias these days? it would need in addition other elements, obsolete, for example a temple in Delphi etc.

bay leaf sauce is absolutely healthy in normal use, in sauce.

for me: from now on I will do as usual, 1 small leaf for a bouquet garni.

I don't believe everything, neither the TV nor the Internet.
Nanie

as for the laurel-sauce, seeing little dry interest in it, I use it fresh.

I wouldn't chew it either, just tasted, gotta hang on
it would be necessary to chew the leaves of whole branches to have a toxic side and to obtain hallucinations. lol

(there is surely something else faster)

and who wants to play the Pythias these days? it would need in addition other elements, obsolete, for example a temple in Delphi etc.

bay leaf sauce is absolutely healthy in normal use, in sauce.

for me: from now on I will do as usual, 1 small leaf for a bouquet garni.

I don't believe everything, neither the TV nor the Internet.
Nanie

recently the journalists, those who know everything, said that the Loire Atlantique department (Nantes) wanted to "become Breton again".
ineptitude the Loire altantique, of which Nantes is still Breton, no need to Re-become.

the 5 ditto in a cultural program forgot this department.
some locals have forgotten themselves. or haven't learned it.

these journalists. sometimes lack seriousness and convey nonsense.

Not being able to sleep, I watch Carine and you with Clelia Ventura on Cuisine TV. And in the recipe, you have to put bay leaf. Clélia specifies that she puts bay leaf to dry because the fresh is toxic, which Carine immediately confirms.

Having a bay laurel in the garden and always using the fresh bay laurel, I was more than astonished as no one has ever been sick to my knowledge. So I searched the net a bit and got confirmation of what I thought, it's c. laughs. I took the opportunity to come across an old discussion on the Marmite http://www.marmiton.org/forum/theme-patisserie/d-feuilles-de-laurier-sauce-121592.aspx

Considering when the discussion dates, I find it interesting to remember that we can frankly go there and eat bay leaf with fresh sauce.

Having said that, the proposed recipe which was a macaronade prepared by Lino Ventura seemed very good. Too bad the CuisineTV site does not provide it.

I also think that the confusion is often made between laurier-saucier and laurier-rose, which is really toxic to it.

There are 2 huge bay laurel in my parents' garden, planted by my grandfather ago. this is where I stock up regularly, so I use a few fresh leaves at first, and they gradually dry out on their branch in my kitchen.
And kid, it was my job to get fresh thyme and bay leaf from the garden when we needed it!

I also think that the confusion is often made between laurier-saucier and laurier-rose, which is really toxic to it.

There are 2 huge bay laurel in my parents' garden, planted by my grandfather ago. this is where I stock up regularly, so I use a few fresh leaves at first, and they gradually dry out on their branch in my kitchen.
And kid, it was my job to get fresh thyme and bay leaf from the garden when we needed it!

In nature all plants are more or less poisonous and those which are edible are so just because their toxicity is less (for the whole plant or for only a part, as is the case for rhubarb, the seeds of which can be consumed. stems, but NOT the leaves).
However we also need "poisons" (I'm simplifying, obviously!) For the proper functioning of the heart, for example. So "poisons" are not necessarily bad, as long as they are absorbed in limited quantities.
The bay leaf also contains harmful substances: this is why the ancients dried the leaves before consuming them, because the fresh leaf is bitter and bitterness has always had a bad reputation. That said, you would have to eat tons of it.

I also think that the confusion is often made between laurier-saucier and laurier-rose, which is really toxic to it.

There are 2 huge bay laurel in my parents' garden, planted by my grandfather ago. this is where I stock up regularly, so I use a few fresh leaves at first, and they gradually dry out on their branch in my kitchen.
And kid, it was my job to get fresh thyme and bay leaf from the garden when we needed it!

Pascale, I still think that to be wrong you have to not know the laurel sauce, especially the scent of its characteristic crumpled leaves.
everything is different between them.

learning as a child is the best.

this year they reseeded alone they were full of fruits that I never used dry, not thinking about it.


Laurel sauce

"Laurel sauce
Botanical name Laurus nobilis
French name Laurier sauce
English name Bay Laurel Sweet Bay
Lauraceae family "
http://pages.infinit.net/belber/annehtm/laurus.htm

Пояснение:
This is the variety of bay tree whose leaves can be used in cooking, unlike the "laurier rose" which is extremely toxic.

"Laurel sauce
Botanical name Laurus nobilis
French name Laurier sauce
English name Bay Laurel Sweet Bay
Lauraceae family "
http://pages.infinit.net/belber/annehtm/laurus.htm

"When planting a Bay tree (Latin name Laurus nobilis), be aware that without pruning the tree will grow to 12m (40ft) high by 10m (32ft) wide. 's share of soil nutrients for several meters around. The Bay tree is however very suited to pruning, and can be kept to any height and width if suitable pruning is carried out. "
http://www.gardenaction.co.uk/fruit_veg_diary/fruit_veg_mini.

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Posted by Claire Geslot on

  • Secret Garden
  • the 05-09-2014


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