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Eggplant caviar - an easy recipe with Greek sweets and flavors

Eggplant caviar - an easy recipe with Greek sweets and flavors


Eggplant caviar, how about going to Greece?

Eggplant caviar is an interesting way to suggest cooking eggplant, as we are not necessarily used to here. Who says recipe from Greece, says garlic, says spice, says flavors. Eggplant caviar is an easy recipe, but if you want to do it right, you have to take a little time, even if only the time to confine the garlic. Then nothing really bad ;-). Eggplant caviar reveals pleasant, sweet and spicy flavors, ideal as an aperitif served with pita bread or Greek bread.

For more aperitif with the flavors of Greece:

Number of people:

For 4 to 5 people

Preparation time :

0 h 15 min

Cooking time :

0 h 45 min

Ingredients for Fruit samosas:

• Eggplants: 2
• Garlic: 2 pods
• Olive oil : 2 cases
• Paprika:
1 pinch
• Salt
• Pepper

Utensils needed for the eggplant caviar recipe:

• 1 oven
• 1 thrifty knife
• 1 Small knife
• 1 fork
• 1 spoon
• 1 frying pan

Preparation of the eggplant cavia:

Step 1: Preheat the oven to 180 ° C

Step 2: Prepare the Eggplants:

• Wash the eggplants.
• Prick the skin with a small knife,
• Place them directly on the baking sheet,
• Leave to cook for 45 minutes,
• Then let them cool on a wire rack

Step 3: Preparation of the eggplant flesh

• Cut the eggplants in half lengthwise,
• Remove the flesh with a spoon,
• Place it on a plate and mash it with a fork.

Step 4: Cooking the ingredients quickly

• Finely chop the garlic.
• Heat the pan.
• Add the olive oil ...
• Add the eggplant flesh and garlic ...
• Add the paprika (keep a little for presentation),
• Add salt and pepper.
Remove from heat after 5 minutes.

Step 5: Reserve the eggplant caviar

• Place the eggplant caviar in a bowl,
• Sprinkle with paprika,
• Reserve in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

Step 6 : At table

What to drink with eggplant caviar?

Head to the south-southwest of France, where we will choose young wines from the langue d'ooc.
• White wine or red wine.

My little preference:

A white from the Rhône valley: Crozes-Hermitage.

summary

Recipe name

Eggplant caviar

Author

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Preparation time

Cooking time

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Average grade

5 Based on 1 Review (s)


The kourabiedes are gourmet Greek shortbreads traditionally consumed during the end of the year celebrations. Crunchy almonds, a few notes of orange and icing sugar sprinkled on top for a small cake that will appeal to young and old alike!

Ingredients for about twenty kourabiedes:

- 1/2 sachet of vanilla sugar

- 1 teaspoon of baking powder

Recipe:

Preheat the oven to 150 ° C. Arrange the almonds on a dish and roast them in the oven until the almonds are lightly golden (about ten minutes). Once the dish is removed, heat the oven to 180 ° C.

In a salad bowl, cut the butter into pieces then work the latter with a wooden spoon to obtain softened butter. Once the right texture is obtained, add icing sugar, vanilla sugar, ouzo and orange blossom and beat until the mixture is well combined. Then add the egg yolk, mix and chop the roasted almonds coarsely before incorporating them into the mixture.

Sift the flour and baking powder directly onto the preparation and work the dough until it is soft.

Spread parchment paper on your baking sheet. Form small balls the size of a large walnut and place on the baking sheet, spacing them sufficiently.

Cook for about 20 minutes, until the kourabiedes are lightly browned. Once the cookies have cooled a little, slide them off the sheet of baking paper.

You can now roll them in a bowl filled with icing sugar for the finishing touch.

To be enjoyed over coffee, tea, or Ouzo of course!


Chinese cuisine: our best recipes

To celebrate the Chinese New Year or for a homemade Asian menu, discover our easy Chinese recipes. Cook the great classics and Chinese specialties: glazed duck with orange, caramel pork, sautéed noodles with vegetables, Chinese soup, coconut flans and other exotic sweets… At the table of the Middle Empire, we meet treat from starter to dessert!


Eggplant caviar - an easy recipe with Greek sweets and flavors

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Krima Tounsiya

The krima tounsiya is a deliciously creamy Tunisian dessert, flavored with rose water, geranium or orange blossom, often richly decorated with rosebuds, silver dragees and dried fruits, pistachios, hazelnuts or almonds.

Tunisian desserts

You could say that Tunisians love desserts, or anything sweet, for that matter. On the other side of the Maghreb, the Levant and the Middle East, you will find a veritable treasure trove of wonderful sweets, cookies, pastries and puddings. And they are also beautifully decorated. Sometimes the decorations are simple, sometimes incredibly extravagant.

Like many other countries where fruit grows in abundance (e.g. Turkey, Thailand, Morocco or India), the daily dessert in Tunisia is usually fruit-based, whether simple or prepared from a one way or another, as for example, in this beautiful orange and cinnamon salad from Morocco.

Related Posts:

Elaborate desserts and pastries, such as bjaouia, griouech, the makroud and, of course, baklava, are traditionally prepared and served for celebrations and to welcome guests home. That said, it is not unusual to now see them on the stalls of every pastry shop on every street corner in North Africa.

Since Tunisia is a predominantly Muslim country, in addition to the usual family celebrations of homecoming, babies, birthdays and weddings, almost every month of the Islamic calendar provides a reason to feast on these sweets.

Flowers as aromas

Floral waters, such as geranium, rose and orange, have been used since the dawn of time to flavor desserts, cakes, syrups, drinks and pastries (e.g. samsa) from Asia to the Mediterranean.

In Arab cuisine, orange blossoms, being white and somewhat delicate, are a symbol of purity, and thus, in addition to being a traditional wedding flower, are used to flavor the kitchen at wedding celebrations.

Orange blossom water is also added to pure water for drinking and to mask the sometimes unpleasant flavor that comes from a high mineral content.

Geranium flower water is a bit of a misnomer as it is actually pelargonium that is used for culinary purposes, not geranium. The most commonly used pelargoniums are rose, lemon and mint. As with orange blossoms, pelargonium blossoms are distilled to make fragrant waters to add to sweet dishes.

In addition, the flowers and leaves can be dried, crushed and added to foods, vinegars and teas. Fresh pelargonium leaves can be used to flavor cakes by lining the base of a cake pan, then pouring the batter on top. The leaves are removed and discarded once the cake has been unmolded.

The use of roses for both culinary and medicinal purposes, as well as cosmetics, dates back to the ancient world. Rose water itself was a by-product of rose attar (rose oil). The Phoenicians considered roses as important as wheat and fruit, and like their Greek and Roman counterparts, they cultivated large municipal rose gardens.

Some of the most famous recipes that use rose as a flavoring are the Turkish delight turkish gulab jamun and the biryani.

What is the difference between custard and custard?

Technically, custard is only thickened with eggs, and can be quite thick, usually used in cold dishes, such as trifle and floating island, or or so more liquid, and used as a sweet sauce, known outside of Great Britain like custard.

When a starch is added as an additional thickener, such as cornstarch, rice flour or all-purpose flour, it becomes custard. It is the basis of Portuguese pasteis de nata, éclairs and quindim from Brazil.

The m’halbi, the muhallebi, the malabi and the muhallabia are all similar to krima tounsiya, the difference being that rice flour is used instead of cornstarch, and no egg yolks are used.

Here are some other cream recipes:

How to do krima tounsiya

Krima tounsiya is very easy to prepare, although different cooks have their own way of doing it: some whisk all the ingredients together, then heat them, while others heat the milk and make a paste with the sugar, eggs and cornstarch, which is then added to the milk. Some cooks do not use egg yolks, while others do.

This recipe is validated by our expert in Tunisian cuisine, chef Mounir Arem. Chef Mounir is the chef and owner of Le Baroque restaurant in Tunis.


Eggplant caviar - an easy recipe with Greek sweets and flavors

The secret of the Italian "mammas" (finally) unveiled

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Armenian Dolmas with Cabbage

Written by Emma K and published from Overblog

The dolmas, Lahana dolmas, or stuffed vegetables is a typical recipe in Armenia.

Dolmas are stuffed vegetables. You can stuff with minced meat, rice, mint, coriander, parsley and spices so it will be a hot dolma recipe. Or simply with rice, balsamic vinegar and hash browns, then it will be a cold dolma recipe.

Very widespread in oriental cuisine, the recipe for dolmas is found in Armenia, Greece (cold rice dolmas), Lebanon, Iran.

Regarding minced meat, some will take beef, others veal or lamb. You can also mix the meats.

Dolmas can therefore be made from vegetables: tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, zucchini, cabbage

Here is the recipe for cabbage dolmas that can also be done with vine leaves. (see link of the recipe for dolmas with vine leaves below):

Preparation time: 1 hour

Cooking time: 45 minutes

Ingredients: for 6 people:

- 650g of minced meat (beef + lamb, or just one of the 2 meats)

- 4 tomatoes or a can of peeled tomatoes

- 2 plain yogurts (Greek, Bulgarian or classic yoghurts)

- 1 small bunch of mint (or dried mint)

- 2 small glasses of rice (basmati or round rice)

- 3 tablespoons of turmeric

- optional, depending on your taste: 2 tablespoons of ground cumin

- 2 teaspoons of powdered sugar for the coulis

Preparation:

1) Cabbage: Separate the leaves and blanch them in a pot of boiling water for 4 minutes. Drain them. Remove the ribs with a knife (that is to say the white part which is thick and which would make it difficult to make dolmas). Cut the large cabbage leaves in half.

2) Rice: Cook it in a saucepan of salted boiling water for 10 minutes. The rice must remain crunchy because it will finish cooking while the dolmas are cooking. Then drain it and let it cool.

3) The stuffing: Peel and chop the onions and garlic very finely and put in a bowl. Add the raw minced meat and the spices: salt, pepper, thyme, turmeric, for those who like cumin, and the parsley and mint chopped very finely. Stir in the drained rice. Mix the stuffing well with your hands.

4) Rolling dolmas:

-take a cabbage leaf. At the top of the sheet, on the side of the ribs (the white of the cabbage), put a little stuffing that you will shape into a small sausage or large cigar.

- Fold the upper part of the sheet over the stuffing then vertically fold the 2 rounded sides of the sheet to give a "straight" shape to the dolma.

- Roll the dolma over the rest of the cabbage leaf and place it in a casserole dish in which you will have placed at the bottom of this one beforehand 2 large cabbage leaves.

- Repeat the operation of rolling the dolmas and put them in the casserole dish, squeezing them tightly next to each other to prevent them from coming apart during cooking.

5) Cooking dolmas: Drizzle the dolmas with a drizzle of olive oil and lemon juice and cook for 45 minutes over low heat in a covered casserole dish.

6) Tomato coulis: Prepare with the cut tomatoes or the canned tomatoes, a coulis that you will cook in a saucepan with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper and a little sugar for 45 minutes. Mix in a blender.

Enjoy the cabbage dolmas, hot, with tomato coulis and plain yogurt.

Armenian meat dolmas with grape leaves

Preparation time: 1 hour

Cooking time: 45 minutes

Ingredients: for 6 people:

- 650g of minced meat (beef + lamb, or just one of the 2 meats)

- 4 tomatoes or a can of peeled tomatoes

- 2 plain yogurts (Greek, Bulgarian or classic yoghurts)

- 1 small bunch of mint (or dried mint)

- 2 small glasses of rice (basmati or round rice)

- 3 tablespoons of turmeric

- optional, depending on your taste: 2 tablespoons of ground cumin

- 2 teaspoons of powdered sugar for the coulis

Preparation:

1) Cabbage: Separate the leaves and blanch them in a pot of boiling water for 4 minutes. Drain them. Remove the ribs with a knife (that is to say the white part which is thick and which would make it difficult to make dolmas). Cut the large cabbage leaves in half.

2) Rice: Cook it in a saucepan of salted boiling water for 10 minutes. The rice must remain crunchy because it will finish cooking while the dolmas are cooking. Then drain it and let it cool.

3) The stuffing: Peel and chop the onions and garlic very finely and put in a bowl. Add the raw minced meat and the spices: salt, pepper, thyme, turmeric, for those who like cumin, and the parsley and mint chopped very finely. Stir in the drained rice. Mix the stuffing well with your hands.

4) Rolling dolmas:

-take a cabbage leaf. At the top of the sheet, on the side of the ribs (the white of the cabbage), put a little stuffing that you will shape into a small sausage or large cigar.

- Fold the upper part of the sheet over the stuffing then vertically fold the 2 rounded sides of the sheet to give a "straight" shape to the dolma.

- Roll the dolma over the rest of the cabbage leaf and place it in a casserole dish in which you will have placed at the bottom of this one beforehand 2 large cabbage leaves.

- Repeat the operation of rolling the dolmas and put them in the casserole dish, squeezing them tightly next to each other to prevent them from coming apart during cooking.

5) Cooking dolmas: Drizzle the dolmas with a drizzle of olive oil and lemon juice and cook for 45 minutes over low heat in a covered casserole dish.

6) Tomato coulis: Prepare with the cut tomatoes or the canned tomatoes, a coulis that you will cook in a saucepan with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper and a little sugar for 45 minutes. Mix in a blender.

Enjoy the cabbage dolmas, hot, with tomato coulis and plain yogurt.


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