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Information About Cosmos

Information About Cosmos


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Cosmos Plant Varieties: Learn About Types Of Cosmos Plants

By Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer

When it comes to considering the many types of cosmos plants on the market, gardeners are faced with a wealth of riches. Learn about a few of the best cosmos plant varieties and cosmos flower types for the garden in this article.

Cosmos Flower Diseases – Reasons Cosmos Flowers Are Dying

By Bonnie L. Grant, Certified Urban Agriculturist

Cosmos plant diseases range from fungal to bacterial and into insect vectored viruses. Controlling insects, providing proper irrigation and planting healthy plants can minimize these problems. Click here to learn more in this article.

Common Insects On Cosmos: Treating Pests On Cosmos Plants

By Bonnie L. Grant, Certified Urban Agriculturist

Cosmos plant pests are rare and generally don't cause significant damage to the health of the plant. What pests do cosmos get? Learn about treating pests on cosmos plants in this article and keep your flowers looking beautiful.

Cosmos Not Flowering: Why Are My Cosmos Not Blooming

By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener

Cosmos is a showy annual plant commonly grown in gardens. But what happens when there are no blooms on cosmos? Read this article to learn more about why cosmos will not flower.

Container Grown Cosmos: Tips For Growing Cosmos In Pots

By Jackie Carroll

Growing cosmos in pots is easy, and you?ll be rewarded with plenty of flowers for cut or dried arrangements, or you can simply enjoy them in their pot. Read here to learn more about container grown cosmos.

Cosmos Flower Care – Tips For Growing Cosmos

By Becca Badgett, Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden

Cosmos plants are an essential for many summer gardens, reaching varying heights and in many colors, adding frilly texture to the flowerbed. Growing cosmos is simple, and this article can help.


Oxalis plants are nycytinastic

One interesting aspect of oxalis plants is how their leaves react at night.

The leaves of the purple shamrock – oxalis triangularis – have a habit of closing up at night, a trait known as nyctinasty. This habit is caused by light and temperature variations at night.

Although oxalis can take some sunlight, it is not uncommon for the leaves to wither and drop off in the middle of summer. Plants in a slightly shady spot seem to do better.

It grows better in the spring months when the temperatures are cooler.

Toxicity of oxalis

The leaves are poisonous to pets but they have a bitter taste to them so poisoning is not too much of a problem since cats and dogs tend to avoid the plant.


Growing Bright Lights Cosmos Garden Seeds

  • Taxonomy:Cosmos sulphureus
  • Other Names: Sulfur Cosmos, Yellow Cosmos
  • Seed Type: Annual
  • Sow Indoors or Outdoors: Bright Lights cosmos seeds are popularly sown outdoors directly after the frost. But for earliest spring blooms, begin seeds indoors 4 – 6 weeks prior and harden off to a sunny place in the garden or decorative planter. Bright Lights cosmos is just as popular indoors as out. Germination will take 14 – 21 days in full lighting.
  • Days to Maturity: 56 – 63 days
  • Hardiness Zone: 2 – 11
  • Planting Depth: Lightly press 4 – 6 seeds into soil
  • Plant Spacing: 12”
  • Growth Habit: 36” tall mounded shrub with a 12 – 24” spread of 2 – 3” daisy-like blooms
  • Soil Preference: Average, medium dry, well-drained
  • Light Preference: Full sun
  • Diseases/Pests/Troubleshooting: Bright Lights cosmos is a hardy full sun performer known to be low-maintenance and tolerant to heat and drought. Do not overwater because cosmos will suffer in overly saturated and poorly drained gardens. Plants may reseed for next season, but may do so too aggressively to the point where it becomes invasive. Bright Lights cosmos has no serious insects, pests, or diseases.
  • Color: Fiery shades of sunburst yellow and orange
  • Seeds Per Package:
    • 1 g - Approximately 120 Seeds
    • 1 oz- Approximately 3,400 Seeds
    • 4 oz - Approximately 13,600 Seeds

Bright Lights cosmos seeds are popularly sown outdoors directly after the frost. But for earliest spring blooms, begin seeds indoors 6 – 8 weeks prior and harden off to a sunny place in the garden or decorative planter. Bright Lights cosmos is just as popular indoors as out. Germination will take 14 – 21 days in full lighting. Lightly press 4 – 6 Bright Lights cosmos seeds 24" apart into average, medium dry, and well-drained soil in full sun. Bright Lights cosmos is a hardy full sun performer known to be low-maintenance and tolerant to heat and drought. Do not overwater because cosmos will suffer in overly saturated and poorly drained gardens. Plants may reseed for next season, but may do so too aggressively to the point where it becomes invasive. Bright Lights cosmos has no serious insects, pests, or diseases. Bright Lights cosmos seeds mature in 56 – 63 days as 36” tall mounded shrubs with a 12 – 24” spread of 2 – 3” daisy-like blooms.

Cosmos sulphureus, or more commonly known as just Cosmos, is native to the arid and warm climates of Mexico, but has since been naturalized throughout most of the world's similar climates. Although not as aggressive as other varieties of cosmos, Cosmos sulphureus grows so effortlessly in the United States that it is still considered an invasive species in many counties along the lower half of the states.


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