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Cylindropuntia fulgida

Cylindropuntia fulgida


Succulentopedia

Cylindropuntia fulgida (Jumping Cholla)

Cylindropuntia fulgida (Jumping Cholla) is a tree-like cactus with one low-branching trunk. It grows up to 13.3 feet (4 m) tall, with…


Opuntia, Prickly Pear Cactus, Boxing Glove Cholla, Dog's Ear Cholla 'Monstrosa'

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cylindropuntia (sil-in-drop-UN-shee-uh) (Info)
Species: fulgida var. mammillata
Cultivar: Monstrosa
Synonym:Opuntia fulgida f. monstrosa
Synonym:Cylindropuntia fulgida var. mammillata f. monstrosa

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Black Canyon City, Arizona

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jan 20, 2016, cmcd from Silverton, OR wrote:

My question is, I have a boxing glove Cholla and it has some kind of problem where parts are dying. Pruned it today and in one spine there was a brown center which makes me wonder that it has some kind of bug. Could this be a cochineal bug and how to get rid if it. I am in Chandler, Az. It has been in the ground for 2 years and I love it but don't want to loose it. I walk in our neighborhood and I haven not seen one like it.

On Apr 28, 2012, Peterthecactusguy from Black Canyon City, AZ wrote:

These plants are located in several locations in Black Canyon City Arizona. I have one that I got from a piece that I got from a friend. It roots easily and grows nicely. At least on the pieces I have handled it's much easier to use your bare hands and carefully grab between the areoles. The spines are short.. From the mammilata part of the the name.. (its a nearly spineless form of C. fulgida. ) Also mine tends to crest.

On Aug 23, 2010, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

this is a nice looking cactus, but one of the most horrific in terms of handling in my yard of cacti. can't use gloves of any kind. the spines will find their way through. And the plant breaks apart easily with the lost pieces seemingly magnetically atttracted to my body- yeouch! Had to eventually get rid of this plant.

On Sep 6, 2006, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

This monstrose form of Cylindropuntia fulgida is the "mammillata" variety that has monstruosed and will usually end up cresting.
The full latin name is Cylindropuntia fulgida var. mammillata f. monstose cristate


Crested Chain Fruit Cholla 'Cristate'

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cylindropuntia (sil-in-drop-UN-shee-uh) (Info)
Species: fulgida var. mammillata
Cultivar: Cristate
Synonym:Cylindropuntia fulgida var. mammillata f. cristate

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Black Canyon City, Arizona

Gardeners' Notes:

On Sep 15, 2012, Peterthecactusguy from Black Canyon City, AZ wrote:

I have one of these that I got as a cutting off of another one. Actually more accurately I got one from a segment that fell off of the mother plant. Mine has small crests and is also possibly monstrose as well. I don't really know where these came from, but in Black Canyon City they are all over the place, all about the same age, all gotten in the 1960s if I had to guess from their size, they are older plants.

I know that cacti aren't everyone's cup of tea but this plant lacks glochids and has smaller shorter spines so it's much easier to handle, I have picked up some of the segments with my bare hands before. That being said it's a wonderful cactus and it grows well in my yard in full sun year round. Has anyone else that had this plant ever seen one bloom? in the 12 years I. read more have been around these I have never seen one bloom.


Cylindropuntia Species, Chain Fruit Cholla, Hanging Chain Cholla, Jumping Cholla

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cylindropuntia (sil-in-drop-UN-shee-uh) (Info)
Species: fulgida (FUL-jih-duh) (Info)
Synonym:Opuntia fulgida
Synonym:Cylindropuntia fulgida var. fulgida

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Lucerne Valley, California

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jun 24, 2018, lasertrimman from Tucson, AZ wrote:

A cactus garden will never take the place of a petting zoo. With this in mind, even a cactus garden will reach new levels of threat with Jumpers. Curve-billed thrashers will build their nests on the top of these plants because ground dwelling predators have not figured out how to climb over the nasty spines.

Jumping Cholla branches have harpooned spines each with a protective "paper" sheath to keep the barbs extremely sharp for the moment of action. Touch a needle and it will securely anchor to your skin. Pull it out and the mooring quills will yank flesh with them. Grab an attached branch with your free hand and you have suddenly inserted many more spines into your innocent self.

GET TOOLS (fork, tongs or even sticks) AND SLOWLY . read more PRY THE BRANCH OFF

I have dozens of these beautiful cacti on my property. I have grown most of them from branches off of a mature plant. Stick a broken branch in the ground anywhere and it takes off.

I have not seen this plant for sale in any local Tucson nursery. You cannot legally extract and transport this indigenous Arizona plant without a permit. I think you can transport branches legally without a permit and therefore you can start your own plants from gathered unrooted pieces.

On Jan 31, 2017, DenisBronxite from Jamaica, NY wrote:

I rooted four cuttings of Cylindropuntia fulgida a few years ago. The spines are terribly dangerous. They even penetrated welder's gloves. I had to use tongs and fat wads of rolled-up newspaper to manipulate them.
Water very very sparingly. One teaspoon every few weeks for each cutting (a cutting is a segment of the plant) is enough. Never give even rooted cuttings a heavy watering. I killed my rooted cuttings this way. They were just starting in on their growing season, and I reasoned that they could tolerate the extra water. Not likely!

On Mar 28, 2010, JohnTS71 from San Antonio, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

This plant loves the south texas soil. This plant has a rapid growth rate and will produce tons of arms once its established. I recently pruned around 50 arms and gave them out to people I know who wanted this unique cacti. My plant has not bloomed yet though.

On Mar 18, 2010, ogrejelly from Gilbert, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

As Palmbob indicates there is nothing worse than getting one of these in you. I have had them go right through a hiking boot and once in they barb and make it impossible to pull out. Anything they touch they will get stuck to.

I do however contend that this is a beautiful cactus. When the morning or evening light hits the Jumping Cholla spines, they light up with a glow unlike any plant I have seen. In areas where they grow prolifically like on Route 60 near just past Gold Canyon, AZ they create an amazing environment when mixed with saguaro and ocotillo. I think it is one of the most beautiful desert environments I have seen. .

On May 27, 2007, Theboneman from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Although it has lots of spines as well as it seems to jump at you when you get to close to it, it is a really cool plant the is good to have in the background as well as it is good at keeping the dogs from pooping in your yard. :)
I like it a lot and wish that my parents would let me grow more. I love all types of chollas so if you know of any good ones let me know.

On Aug 21, 2004, randi_rives from Lubbock, TX (Zone 7a) wrote:

This a very stickery plant, but it's spring blooms are awesome. Little bees love it. It is easy to keep trimmed up and it never has to be watered.

works well in my cacti garden. just watch your backside :)

On Jun 8, 2004, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

AKA, Hanging Chain Cholla, chain fruit cholla, cholla brincadora, velas de coyote.

I've seen this growing in the wild surrounding Phoenix in Oro Valley, AZ and on the 'El Camino Del Diablo Trail' (Devils' Highway) that runs between Ajo and Wellton, Arizona in the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge.
Also seen these growing in the wild on the West Ruby Road Trail in Arizona (South of Tucson), off of Interstate 19 through to Ruby, AZ and on to Arivaca, AZ.

On Nov 1, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Also known as Cholla or jumping cholla back in New Mexico where I grew up, this is one of the least garden-friendly plants I can think of and would strongly advise against growing it unless you have a pain wish. There are many times I can think why this cactus was aptly named, having hiked thousands of miles about the high deserts and been nailed by this plant even though I was sure I had clearance of it. The spines are very well barbed and nearly impossible to pull out intact. It takes months for your body to finally eject the spine, if ever. Just brush up against it and an entire leaf full of spines will immediately unattach itself from the mother plant and stick into you. It's in this way it ends up all over the place because it roots whereever the leaf falls. And it's not that gr. read more eat looking a cactus to begin with, though the 'skeletons' of this plant are highly ornamental- long cylinders full of holes- often used in decorations by the Indians.


Plants→Chollas→Jumping Cholla (Cylindropuntia fulgida)

Common names:
(2) Jumping Cholla
Hanging Chain Cholla
Chain Fruit Cholla
Cholla Brincadora
Velas de Coyote
Cholla
Chainfruit Cholla

Botanical names:
Cylindropuntia fulgida Accepted
Opuntia fulgida Synonym

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit:Shrub
Cactus/Succulent
Life cycle:Perennial
Sun Requirements:Full Sun
Fruit:Showy
Flowers:Showy
Suitable Locations:Xeriscapic
Uses:Provides winter interest
Will Naturalize
Resistances:Deer Resistant
Drought tolerant
Propagation: Seeds:Start indoors
Can handle transplanting
Other info: Fruit can take root and form a new plant without having to use its seeds needs neutral soil pH
Propagation: Other methods:Cuttings: Stem
Layering
Other: Easy to root from stem segments
Containers:Needs excellent drainage in pots
Miscellaneous:Tolerates poor soil

A cactus garden will never take the place of a petting zoo. With this in mind, even a cactus garden will reach new levels of threat with Jumpers. Curve-billed thrashers will build their nests on the top of these plants because predators have not figured out how to climb over the nasty spines.

Jumping Cholla branches have harpooned spines, each with a protective "paper" sheath to keep the barbs sharp for their moment of action. Touch a needle and it will securely anchor to your skin. Pull it out and the mooring quills will yank flesh and blood with them. If you reflexively grab a clinging branch with your hand, you will have suddenly inserted many more spines into your innocent self.

GET TOOLS (fork, tongs or even sticks) AND SLOWLY PRY THE BRANCH OFF

I have dozens of these beautiful cacti on my property. I have grown most of them from branches off of a mature plant. Stick a broken branch in the ground, right side up or upside down and it takes off.

I have not seen this plant for sale in any local Tucson or Phoenix nursery. You cannot legally extract and transport this indigenous Arizona plant without a permit. I think you can transport branches without a permit and therefore you can start your own plants from gathered unrooted pieces.


Watch the video: Collection of unseen nature- ROGERSPLANTSHOP