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Chinese Sedum

Chinese Sedum


Succulentopedia

Sedum tetractinum 'Coral Reef' (Chinese Sedum)

Sedum tetractinum 'Coral Reef' (Chinese Sedum) is a red-leaved cultivar of Sedum tetractinum. It is a mat-forming stonecrop with foliage…


Chinese Sedum 'Coral Reef' (Sedum tetractinum)

Features

Coral Reef is one of those plants that looks good in any season. The succulent foliage is a colorful combination of green tinged with red, the overall habit is neat and tidy, summer brings a flush of flowers that lure butterflies and bees to the garden, and in the autumn the foliage turns intensely bronze bringing a warm glow to the landscape. On top of all of its other great features this sedum is incredibly tolerant to heat and drought conditions.

Classic plants for rock gardens! Looks great filling in between rocks and spilling over container edges. Perfect selection for filling in between paving stones.

Plant Feed

Watering

Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings.

Basic Care Summary

Tolerates poor soil, heat, and drought. Does best in light, well-drained soil. Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Protect from excessive winter moisture.

Planting Instructions

Perennials can be planted anytime from spring through fall.

Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller) to a depth of 12-16” (30-40cm). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients, and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or all-purpose feed that encourages blooming (for example fertilizers labeled 5-10-5).

Check the plant label for suggested spacing and the mature height of the plant. Position plants so that taller plants are in the center or background of the landscape design and shorter plants in the foreground. To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.

Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.

Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.

Plan ahead, for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It’s best to install cages early in the spring, or at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread.

Finish up with a 2” (5cm) layer of mulch such as shredded bark or compost to make the garden look tidy, reduce weeds, and retain soil moisture.

Watering Instructions

New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering may be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.

Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others, like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.

Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.

Thoroughly soaking the ground up to 8” (20 cm) every few days is better than watering a little bit daily. Deep watering encourages roots to grow further into the ground resulting in a sturdier plant with more drought tolerance.

To check for soil moisture, use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water.

Fertilizing Instructions

Incorporate fertilizer into the soil when preparing beds for new plants. Established plants should be fed in early spring, then again halfway through the growing season. Avoid applying fertilizer late in the growing season. This stimulates new growth that can be easily damaged by early frosts.

Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).

Reduce the need to fertilize in general by applying a 1-2” (3-5cm) layer of mulch or compost annually. As mulch breaks down it supplies nutrients to the plants and improves the overall soil condition at the same time.

Pruning Instructions

Depending on the flowering habit, snip off faded blooms individually, or wait until the blooming period is over and remove entire flower stalk down to the base of the plant. Removing old flower stems keeps the plant’s energy focused on vigorous growth instead of seed production. Foliage can be pruned freely through the season to remove damaged or discolored leaves, or to maintain plant size.

Do not prune plants after September 1st. Pruning stimulates tender new growth that will damage easily when the first frosts arrive. Perennial plants need time to prepare for winter, or “harden off”. Once plants have died to the ground they are easy to clean up by simply cutting back to about 4” (10cm) above the ground.

The flowering plumes and foliage of ornamental grasses create a beautiful feature in the winter landscape. Leave the entire plant for the winter and cut it back to the ground in early spring, just before new growth starts.

Perennials should be dug up and divided every 3-4 years. This stimulates healthy new growth, encourages future blooming, and provides new plants to expand the garden or share with gardening friends.


Chinese Sedum (Sedum tetractinum) – Succulent plants

Chinese Sedum (Sedum tetractinum) is a herbaceous perennial, low growing succulent ground hugger. It spreads by runners forming a mat of overlapping, rounded foliage which resembles fish scales. The leaves are up to 3 cm long and up to 1.3 cm wide, bright green turning dark bronze often deciduous in winter. The flower spikes of tiny star-shaped yellow flowers appear over the shiny foliage during summer. Plants root at their tips to eventually form large carpets.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Sedum

Scientific Name: Sedum tetractinum Fröd.
Common Names: Chinese Sedum, Chinese Stonecrop, Fish-scale Sedum

How to grow and maintain Chinese Sedum (Sedum tetractinum):

Light:
It requires full sun to light shade. Two to four hours of afternoon sunlight is best for the plant. South-facing windows are ideal or west, north-facing will not encourage growth.

Soil:
It grows best in Well-draining, poor soils, sand, rock gardens, and rich garden soil, under a variety of light levels. Use 2 parts potting soil, 2 parts coarse sand, 2 parts peat and 1 part perlite or crushed charcoal.

Temperature:
It Prefers ideal temperature between 65°F – 75°F / 18°C – 25°C during summer. Temperature no lower than 50 °F – 55°F / 10°F – 12.7°C is best. It does best in hotter conditions. Try not to keep the plant outside in freezing temperatures.

Water:
Sedum plant needs more water in the spring and summer, but you can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. During the winter season, reduce watering.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize once a month with a diluted liquid fertilizer or use a slow-releasing nitrogen-based fertilizer, during the spring and summer season.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by stem and leaf cuttings. you can break off one of the stems and push it into the ground where you would like to grow it. The stem will root very easily. Or Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Re-Potting:
Re-pot your plant every year or every two years. As the plant grows, you should move it to a wider pot so the new stems and roots have enough room to develop. Repotting is best done during spring.

Pests and Diseases:
Sedum plant has is no serious pests or diseases issues. Watch for aphids and flies. You can dispose of them by spraying insecticidal soap or neem oil over the foliage.


Sedum Species, Stonecrop, Chinese Sedum

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Charleston, South Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

On Aug 21, 2008, rampbrat from Abilene, TX (Zone 7b) wrote:

I have mine in a pot and it has done well. Plan to put is in the ground in Sept.

On May 11, 2005, Happenstance from Northern California, CA wrote:

Very sturdy and hardy Sedum. It's a rampant grower and can become invasive, but is easily removed.

On Apr 22, 2005, rainycz from Newark, DE (Zone 7a) wrote:

I use this sedum as a groundcover on a steep hill where I had an erosion problem. Works great!


Watch the video: Sedum Varieties for Gardens and Containers