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Baby’s Breath Propagation: Learn About Propagating Baby’s Breath Plants

Baby’s Breath Propagation: Learn About Propagating Baby’s Breath Plants


By: Becca Badgett, Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden

Baby’s breath is asmall, delicate bloom included as a finishing touch in many bouquets and flowerarrangements. Masses of star-shaped flowers look great in outside flower beds,too. Gypsophila grows in several varieties, preferring a moist, sunny spot inthe landscape.

Propagating Baby’s Breath Plants

You may have planted seeds of thisflower without success. Seeds are tiny and sometimes a little tricky to getgoing. When propagating baby’s breath, you will likely have better success bytaking cuttings from an existing plant or planting one in the landscape.

Baby’s breath is normally grown asan annual flower in most areas, but some types are hardy perennials. All typesare easily grown from cuttings taken in early summer. Starting new baby’sbreath takes time, about a month, but is worth the wait.

How to Propagate Baby’s Breath Cuttings

Use clean, sterilized containersand fill with well-draining soil or mix. Take a 3- to 5-inch (7.6 to 13 cm.) cuttingat an angle with a sharp, clean tool. Dip the cutting in water, then rooting hormone, andplace into soil with about two inches (5 cm.) of stem above the soil line. Takeoff any leaves touching the soil. Continue this process until you have the numberof cuttings you want.

Water from the bottom by placingcontainers into a water-filled plant saucer. Remove when the soil is moist andplace the pot into a clear plastic bag. Tie it up and place in a warm spot awayfrom direct sunshine. Check for roots in four weeks. Do this by lightly tuggingthe stems. If you feel resistance, roots have developed, and you can proceedwith Gypsophila propagation. Plant each branch into a separate container orinto well-draining soil outside.

Starting a New Baby’s Breath Transplant

If you have no baby’s breath fromwhich to take a cutting, you can get ready for Gypsophila propagation bypurchasing a small plant. Prepare the spot in the garden for the transplantahead of time. The fragile roots of this plant need air circulation, and thiscannot happen when it is planted in heavy clay without amendment.

Remove unwanted plant material fromthe planting area and loosen the soil. Mix in finished compost, manure, freshtopsoil, or other organic material that willprovide optimal drainage. Mix in coarse sand if you have it available.

Plant baby’s breath so it remainsat the same level as it is in the pot. Gently spread roots out so they canreadily grow. Water at soil level. Avoid wetting the foliage with futurewatering when possible.

When the plant is established andnew growth occurs regularly, you can begin baby’s breath propagation bycuttings. Grow this plant in a sunny area with afternoon shade in the hottestareas.

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How to Grow Bear's Breeches

Acanthus means bract, which are modified leaves that are often more colorful than the actual flowers. They help to attract pollinators. The botanical name for Bear's Breeches comes from the thorny look of their purple bracts. Although there are about 30 species of acanthus, only a couple are commonly grown as garden plants. While they are imposing and beautiful, they can be erratic, blooming well in one year and disappointing in another.

These are wide plants and will need at least 3 to 4 feet of garden real estate each as they like to spread out. The leaves are wide rosettes of arching, shiny, dark green leaves that are deeply lobed. Because of its bold leaves, Bear’s Breeches pairs well with airy plants, like Crocosmia, Gaura, and ornamental grasses. They are so imposing, you might not notice any plants near them and can be used quite effectively on their own. Expect your Bear’s Breeches to start blooming in late spring to mid-summer and to continue blooming for 3 to 4 weeks. Bloom time depends on both your zone and the whims of the weather.

Bear’s Breeches can be aggressive growers, spreading and squeezing out neighboring plants. To keep them under control, many gardeners place a sunken border around the plants or plant them in bottomless containers, sunk into the ground.

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova


Annual Baby's Breath

Their light, airy texture and petite white or pink flowers make baby's breath a wonderful addition to the garden. This annual is native to the Caucasus and is related to carnations. Because they bloom for only 6 weeks, new seedlings should be started to replace those that have finished blooming.

Description of baby's breath: Annual baby's breath grows to 11/2 feet tall, forming an airy bush with many forked branches covered with flowers. Although the flowers, up to 1/2 inch in diameter, are usually white, there are pink, rose, and carmine forms.

Growing baby's breath: Grow in full sun in average, lime-rich garden soil. They grow rapidly and will come into bloom about 8 weeks after germination. Sow new baby's breath every 2 to 4 weeks to assure continuous bloom for the summer.

Propagating baby's breath: By seed. Sow seeds outdoors in place after the danger of frost has passed. For earlier bloom, sow indoors in peat pots 2 to 3 weeks before planting out, then plant -- pot and all. (They grow so rapidly, it is difficult to separate the seedlings, so plant them in a clump.) Germination takes 10 to 15 days at 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Uses for baby's breath: Baby's breath is effective in borders or cottage gardens. Baby's breath also makes a superb cut flower. It is used primarily as a filler to give unity to arrangements with strong vertical or horizontal lines.

Baby's breath related species: Gypsophila paniculata is a perennial and widely planted. Both single- and double-flowers are found, with Bristol Fairy the most popular species. Gypsophila muralis is a mounding species native to Europe. Garden Bride has light pink flowers. Gypsy is a pink double.

Baby's breath related varieties: The favorite white is Covent Garden, which is also the favorite cut flower strain. Kermesina is a deep rose. Red Cloud has shades ranging from pink to carmine. Mixtures of rose, white, and red are also available.

Scientific name of baby's breath: Gypsophila elegans


Watch the video: Babys breath plant - grow u0026 care